Other Training outcomes

As part of this training program in biotechnology, students are expected to participate in activities such as seminar series, journal clubs and retreats, which augment their Ph.D. program, and provide valuable opportunities for interactions among participating students who typically come from differing departments or programs… The biotechnology training program also is required to include a two or three month industrial internship, to give students a meaningful research experience in a biotechnology or pharmaceutical firm.”

Other Training for Students in Career Development

Over the course of the 3-year traineeship, the BTP provides approximately 12-15 hours of instruction in the core instructional areas specified in NOT-OD-10-019.

The primary venue for RCR is during the monthly lunch meetings of the BTP. During these RCR sessions, we discuss case studies presented either in writing or as videos. The specific discussions held over the past five years are listed below. A member of the BTP Steering Committee moderates each case study discussion.

2017
Pizza Luncheon (1/9/17) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Only a Bridge
Pizza Luncheon (2/6/17) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Noah’s Dilemma
Pizza Luncheon (3/6/17) Bebeau Case Study: The Jessica Banks Case

2016
Pizza Luncheon (10/3/16) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Of Mice & Mendoza
Pizza Luncheon (11/7/16) NSF Video: “A Stampede of Zebras
Pizza Luncheon (12/5/16) Bebeau Case Study: The Charlie West Case

2015
Pizza Luncheon (10/5/13) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Of Mice & Mendoza
Pizza Luncheon (2/18/16) NSF Video: “A Stampede of Zebras
Pizza Luncheon (4/4/16) Bebeau Case Study: The Charlie West Case

2014
Pizza Luncheon (10/16/14) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Only a Bridge
Pizza Luncheon (2/2/15) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Noah’s Dilemma
Pizza Luncheon (5/4/15) Bebeau Case Study: The Jessica Banks Case

2013
Pizza Luncheon (2/11/13) Bebeau Case Study: The Diane Archer Case
Pizza Luncheon (5/6/13) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: The whole truth

2012
Pizza Luncheon (1/9/12) NSF Video: “A Stampede of Zebras”
Pizza Luncheon (4/2/12) Bebeau Case Study: The Charlie West Case
Retreat (5/5/12) Guest speaker Phil Chase, General Counsel, Adimab; Intellectual Property
Pizza Luncheon (5/7/12) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Where credit is due
Pizza Luncheon (11/12/12) Duke University video: Professional Ethics and Science

2011
Retreat (4/3/11) 1 hr discussion of peer review issues
Pizza Luncheon (5/2/11) Bebeau Case Study: The Jessica Banks Case
Pizza Luncheon (10/3/11)AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Of Mice & Mendoza

2010
Pizza Luncheon (1/8/10) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Only a Bridge
Retreat (5/1/10) Technology Licensing (Aaron Schwarz, TLO)
Pizza Luncheon (12/6/10) AAAS Integrity in Scientific Research video: Noah’s Dilemma

In addition to the lunch discussions, at each BTP Annual Retreat an hour is devoted to RCR, alternating annually discussion of Peer Review with discussion of Intellectual Property. We also provide each trainee with a copy of the National Academies booklet, “On being a Scientist”. We also require each trainee to complete the online training in human and animal subjects that MIT provides.

Trainees are involved in hour-long discussions with each of the Steering Committee faculty members (Wittrup, Lauffenburger, Imperiali, Niles, Love) over the course of their tenure on the BTP. Dialog with multiple faculty reinforces common themes far better than listening to any single faculty member in a didactic setting. Some more lecture-like RCR instruction occurs at our annual Retreat, although there is also generally vigorous dialog during these time slots.

Subject Matter: a) conflict of interest; b) human subjects and live vertebrate animal subjects; c) mentor/mentee responsibilities; d) collaborative research, including with industry; e) peer review; f) data acquisition; g) research misconduct; h) responsible authorship; i) scientist as a responsible member of society.

Our available case studies comprehensively cover each of these topics. The topic matter for these case studies is available at http://www.aaas.org/spp/video/thevideos.htm, and is listed here:
Video 1: 
This video highlights issues related to intellectual property, the disclosure of privileged information, sharing information among scientists, crediting the work of others, and the responsiblities of collaborators who encounter questionable conduct by a colleague.
Video 2: 
This video explores the competitive pressures scientists experience to get the data “right” and to publish their findings, mentoring responsibilities, loyalty to and honesty with one’s collaborators, and the selection and reporting of data and record keeping
Video 3
: This case focuses on issues related to the consequences of industrial support for the sharing of data and resources, the role of technology transfer, the effects of commingling public and private funds, and the stresses that scientists encounter in the face of conflicting professional values, legal obligations, and loyalty to colleagues.
Video 4
: This video touches on issues related to authorship practices, the allocation of credit, and the importance of maintaining laboratory notebooks.
Video 5
: Several issues are raised regarding the responsibilities and consequences of reporting suspected research misconduct, institutional responses to misconduct allegations, reporting deviations from research protocol, and the use of animals in research.

We also use written case studies by Muriel Bebeau at the University of Minnesota (http://depts.washington.edu/uwbri/PDF%20Files/Moral_Reasong_in_Scific_Res.pdf). In particular, we do the Jessica Banks, Charlie West, Diane Archer, and Bob Bailey case studies:

The Jessica Banks Case. Jessica Banks has just earned her Ph.D. and wants to take her lab
notebooks when she leaves for her new job. Her lab director, Brian Hayward, objects. She wonders what to do.

The Charlie West Case. Charlie West, a post-doctoral fellow, is tempted to use in his grant
proposal the background section of someone else’s grant proposal. (Linked to the Diane Archer
case.)

The Diane Archer Case. Professor Diane Archer discovers plagiarized materials in a grant proposal submitted by Charlie West, a post-doctoral fellow she knew when he was a graduate student. (Linked to the Charlie West case.)

The Bob Bailey Case. Bob Bailey is a graduate student whose work is not going well. He
blames his troubles in part on the romantic relationship that has developed between his lab director, Peter Martin, and one of his classmates, Sarah Stern. Bailey is concerned that their relationship is (a) bad for Stern and (b) bad for the lab, and he is considering bringing a complaint to the department chair.

We have also rotated in a video made at Duke University that has several short, interesting case studies (http://www.worldcat.org/title/professional-ethics-and-science/oclc/60849901).